Seisia


Seisia is a small islander community in northern Cape York.

It is the smaller one of NPA's two Saibai islander communities - the other one is Bamaga.

It is a beautiful place
, north of Jardine River, in the Northern Peninsula Area.


There are other pretty places up here, but with its white-sand beaches and emerald blue waters, Seisia is one of the better ones.


It is a friendly community, which, in fact, by now is quite multicultural.

seisia beaches

Beautiful Beaches
There are beautiful beaches in the community, with white sands, and surrounded by emerald blue waters, which make the place so colourful. 

Like all the other beaches here, they are not for swimming, but they make excellent photos, including those of sunsets.
 

seisia wharf

Busy Wharf
If there is a hub in the community, it is the wharf. There is somebody here almost all the time - whether fishing, looking for a crocodile to spot, strolling along the beach or the jetty, or coming in or going out on a boat. 
Local kids even jump in for a swim despite the crocs.


seisia fishing

Great Fishing
Like many other places in Cape York, Seisia is an excellent place to fish. And the wharf itself is one of the best and most popular places. 

But locals also fish from rocky headlands, and of course, from the boats. There are also a few tour operators that take you fishing.


seisia camping

Great Camping Ground
Just next door to the wharf is a camping ground. It is a nice beachfront camping ground with powered and unpowered sites, some villas and a lodge. 

Powered camping sites are in so-called "huts" with a roof and small kitchenettes. There is also an on-site kiosk and a restaurant.


seisia history

Seisia History
The whole NPA area, including what is Seisia today, has forever been Injinoo country. 

By them it was called Red Island Point, which in the late 1940s became the second, smaller settlement (after Bamaga) of Saibai islanders. The name SEISIA is a combination of the first letters of the first settlers' names.

Beautiful Beaches

Seisia has beautiful beaches, on each side of the wharf, mostly white sand ones.

seisia beach

They are also known for some great sunsets,
and the one east of the wharf is the waterfont of the camping ground.

seisia sunsets seisia sunset

Seisia Wharf

The wharf is in the middle of the two beaches, and also makes great sunset pics.

seisia wharf seisia wharf sunset

There is some great fish around the wharf, and every now and then you can see crocodiles (you can just see a head and a back on the photo below).

seisia crocodile

Something that does not scare local kids away from swimming!


seisia wharf swimming

Seisia Fishing

But most popular the wharf is with fishing.

seisia wharf cape york seisia wharf sea swift
 
There is cod, trevally, Spanish mackerel, queenfish and barramundi to fish, only to mention a few.

seisia wharf fishing seisia bait fishing

Bait fishing is also good, and spear fishing is popular too, and there is some big fish caught by spearing.

spear fishing

Beachfront Camping Ground

Right next to the eastern beach and the wharf, is a great camping ground.

seisia camping ground reception seisia camping ground beach front

Right at the beachfront with great views, beach huts and even a restaurant.

seisia camping ground hut seisia camping ground restaurant

Seisia History

In front of the Seisia Camping Ground is the "Tropical Bure" - a Papua New Guinean canoe used for cargo, supplies, and sleeping. Seisia's history indeed comes from close to PNG, just as Bamaga's - namely, Saibai Island.

seisia saibai

After the Second World War, when Saibai soldiers returned home from the tip of Cape York peninsula, their already flood-suffering island had a couple of really bad floods. With fresh memories of mainland Australia, a move to the mainland was discussed and decided on.

The first arrivers made a temporary settlement at Mutee Head, while the search went on for better places.


With help of the locals - Injinoo Aboriginal people, they found two places with freshwater sources - Red Island Point and
Ichuru (today's Bamaga).

mugai elu grave mugai elu monument

The first settlers of Red Island Point was the family of Mugai Elu, who arrived in 1948 and used WWII army huts as their home.  

A few years later they invited
some other families, and over the time more people followed as the word got around. The government supplied building materials and slowly the housing was built.

In 1972, they got a new church
, St Francis of Assisi, that replaced their previous, temporary one.

seisia church

In the 1980s, they were allowed to change the name of the community from Red Island Point to Seisia, which was a name put together by the first letters of the names of the first settlers - Sagaukaz, Elu, Isua, Sunai, Ibuai and Aken.

Today, there are about 200 people living in the community, and more than 60% are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait origin.
YumplatokMeriam MirKalaw Lagaw Ya, Kalaw Kawaw Ya and English are some of the languages spoken at home.





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